HOME ABOUT POETRY FICTION NON-FICTION PROJECTS PLAYS CONSULTING LINKS CONTACT

NON-FICTION

Who Needs June Cleaver?
Reviewed by L. Elisabeth Beattie in Louisville’s Courier-Journal, this collection of personal essays, public radio commentaries, and newspaper columns tells stories that, “in their universal significance transcend personal experience.” The reviewer also says, “If one were to select a single word to capture the essence of Constance Alexander's most recent book, that word would surely be grace, for her graceful style complements her grace-filled essays.”

My mother classified the years of her married life by the places she and my father lived. Their first flat was at the Roger Smith Hotel in White Plains, New York. After that was a succession of rented apartments, until they moved into a duplex on Long Island right before World War II. ‘Half a house,’ Mother always described it, as if something were missing.

 
A Christmas Memory
Featured in the literary anthology, Kentucky’s Twelve Days of Christmas, the essay reflects on a child’s wish to find the doll Susie Walker under the tree on Christmas morning, and the disappointment that followed.

Instead of the wide-eyed, apple-cheeked doll I dreamed of, Susie Walker was actually a mini Brunhilde, a clunky kinder with stiff blond braids and stocky legs that resembled tree stumps. Her arms were pudgy, and her greedy little hands were open as the moon, with ray-like, spatulate fingers. Nevertheless, when I was six, I thought Susie was the most beautiful doll in the world, and that I would perish if she were not under my tree Christmas morning.


 
 

 

 
HOME ABOUT POETRY FICTION NON-FICTION PROJECTS PLAYS CONSULTING LINKS CONTACT